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20121101
20121130
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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
and then on the very first day of the year, martin luther king opens up his drive in selma and that takes a good chapter, long chapter early in the book and most people know the story but you have this bloody sunday when they beat up people including john lewis and said a lot of people to the hospital and it's all one television and he goes on tv and says we shall overcome and comes out with the voting rights act that passes in he says that is even more important in the 64 act. very important. and however, during the course of this, it should be regarded as movements were already there, and in fact the student on violating coordinating committee which had already been working for the voting rights act in selma presented martin luther king coming in. they trotted off and on but there was virtually no meeting of the mind between sncc and the southern christian leadership conference and martin luther king on the others and you begin to see the split within the civil rights movement that's pretty irreparable. >> let me play the devil's advocate on this. there are a lot of people who talk about the b
at what happens early in the year. malcolm x assassinated. then selma, ask then, of course, what we have not mentioned yet is in august you have the watts riot. and so here these big developments are taking place, and in your mind, you seem to give a most equal weight, if you will to the unfolding of the '60s with what's going on in civil rights, and the way you almost set this up, though -- i wonder about this -- you almost through a consensus historian take on the civil rights movement. if i were a southern white, i would say that the eve of destruction was eve of '54, '57, or '64. if you will. >> guest: okay. it. >> host: it was when it comes to civil rights, 1965. that may be their perspective. let's talk about that for a second. as kind of a criticism, you almost assume we're all on board with civil rights in '64, or at least it could be managed. at least that much you seem to be saying. >> guest: yes. i'd say '64, is a mentioned before, as a year of enormous strides in the civil rights movement. i wrote a book on brown vs. board case, you mentioned 1954. and as you know, and everyb
to pop. and right now, a look at selma, south of fresno. we have a thunderstorm there, heading into the foothills where it turns into snow at 3500 feet. make sure that you grab a coat, temperatures in the same temperatures in the bay. salinas, 57. it's not going to be as widespread as last night, but there's a chance of showers in the evening and overnight hours. and snow down to 2500. there you go, chilly in the next couple of nights. protect those plants. first, looking at the low that came through, a thunderstorm there. and this is the next and last one that's going to rotate down towards us. it's weaker, and it has this of energy, but still a lot of moisture to be played with. and that's why i'll keep that chance. so during the evening, keep an eye out in the distance, and here's lightning and thunder and rain. you're going to dress warmly and dress for wet weather. here's how it plays out. a few showers in mendocino county in the next hour, and they're better over the oceans than the land. that's going to be the case, but every once in a while, they will pop in the overnig
progress, and then on the very first day of the year martin luther king opens up his drive in selma and that takes up a good chapter early in the book and most people know the story when they beat up people and putting john lewis and send people to the hospital and so one and he goes on tv and says we shall overcome and comes up with a voting rights act that passes and that's even more important than that act. however during the course of the selwa thing the sports that already existed in the civil rights movement which should be regarded as movements were already there and the nonviolent coordinating committee which had already been working for voting rights resembled martin luther king coming in there and wouldn't work for him for the most part but there's virtually no meeting of the - and the southern christian leadership conference on the others and you begin to see the split within the civil rights movement that is pretty irreparable. >> let me play the devil's of a ticket on this. there are a lot of people who talk about the black freedom movement and they see the movement whe
changes in this one is a good one. during that time some 13 years ago there was a very cool selma chang high restaurant located there and it now closed and the lounge and if you remember and it's now closed. a great place to be to hang your hat and really the wind of the world and i want to show you my positive feelings about having this dining come to the area. as you also know even down on union street there is a asian street fair restaurant called [inaudible] and that opened after the loma parada earthquake and revitalized that nairksd there so i am hoping with this new venture that happens at one kearney street as i understand it and welcome and not to make it too pricey. >> we will get an early bird special going. >> all right. any other public comment? seeing none the matter is with the commission. do we have a motion? >> so i think that corner needs something. i think it will do really well. there are great hotels around there, lots of shoppers. we encourage businesses, new businesses to come in and especially people who have different twists and with that i move to appro
cruz mountains. everybody is waiting for the next storms to pop. and right now, a look at selma, south of fresno. we have a thunderstorm there, heading into the foothills where it turns into snow at 3500 feet. make sure that you grab a coat, temperatures in the same temperatures in the bay. salinas, 57. it's not going to be as widespread as last night, but there's a chance of showers in the evening and overnight hours. and snow down to 2500. there you go, chilly in the next couple of nights. protect those plants. first, looking at the low that came through, a thunderstorm there. and this is the next and last one that's going to rotate down towards us. it's weaker, and it has this of energy, but still a lot of moisture to be played with. and that's why i'll keep that chance. so during the evening, keep an eye out in the distance, and here's lightning and thunder and rain. you're going to dress warmly and dress for wet weather. here's how it plays out. a few showers in mendocino county in the next hour, and they're better over the oceans than the land. that's going to be the case, but ev
across our area tonight. you are looking at sam and selma right now. paul as a look at the radar. and you won't believe what it shows. >> a lot of rainfall north of the golden gate. and that's been the focus all evening long. yellows and oranges. that's a rainfall rate of .5 inches per hour. santa rosa, novato. a bit of a break for san rafael. look at the lack of rain from san francisco south of san jose back up to oakland. it's all in the north bay right now. but that's going to change. weather. his job was to protect a >> check live for your neighborhood anytime you want. >>> his job was to protect and 7. now a -- and serve. now a former police channeder is in trouble with -- commander is in trouble with the law himself. he and his wife are accused of trying to swindle an elderly woman out of her estate. >> it makes me sad that people would prey on the elderly like that. and especially under the guise of being a police officer. >> reporter: too upset and disturbed to be identified this, pleasanton resident is talking about her neighbor. police commander matthew messier is behind bars ch
is inherently important. selma still leads to the the voting rights act is not inherently important in terms of decisions in sclc. the black road changes in a way that there's a riot in harlem and they seem to mean some pain. and so, it's not even the sheer violence of it. i think a lot of it has to do -- anything people were shocked by the riot in california, the riot nla. tell us about that. how does it really change the black movement or just the way people perceive civil rights. i guess another way of putting it is what does it do to the black community? what does it do to equate liberalism? >> guest: to white liberalism, but it does is other white liberals were shoulder to shoulder with blacks in the south. some of them got killed. after a while, a lot of them sat back and said these guys are not christlike, nonviolent civil rights people. they are hoodlums. they are burn baby burn. they are bad people fighting police. in the burn down buildings. so, this sort of makes a lot of white people cautious and they're not really sure what is happening here and they don't like what they see. i
what it was about. >> the movie was told they cannot selma during rush hour but at times they are moving equipment their router traffic. >> i think it is awesome. >> most would rather wait until it is on the big screen. >> are you going to avoid it? >> absolutely. >> the movie will be out in march of next year but police are warning commuters today to avoid this area at all cost. >> you might have to sign a few autographs of there. it is 5:07 right now and 40 degrees. >> learn how one wireless carrier >> welcome back. >> let's say good morning once again to jacqui jeras. >> 43 degrees right now. adam caskey is out with storm chaser 7. >>there is a little more to you. right on top of that lip. >>i am trying to stay warm this november. it is mo-vember. i have an update. what is mo-vember? it is when men grow moustaches to raise awareness and funds for prostate cancer and other initiatives. i have an update here. i want to welcome dylan waldron. is live says he is a mountain man after two days. he has a lead on our team. i will have a blog up on wjla.com/weather momentarily.
basically. he needs to go. >> it's funny to make fun of conjoined twins. >> selma hayek. >> let me ask you a question about sheryl. do we think sheryl is an obama supporter or a romney supporter. >> bleep--she don't care about romney obama. it doesn't matter. >> i'm from phoenix. >> arizona. >> so are you--are you following the presidential election. >> yes. >> um, are you into it or annoyed by it? have you had enough? >> i am into it. i like it. we don't have as much recognition in arizona as in nevada. >> it's not a swing state. >> it's not a swing state. everyone knows where arizona swings. nevada is more of a swing state. >> women' going to vote for berry. >> are you going to vote. >> perhaps. >> are you from seattle? >> syria. >> are you following the u.s. elections? >> yes. >> who are you pulling for? >> who? >> in the election, you know, obama. >> oh, okay then, i don't know. i prefer obama. >> what part of nevada are you from. >> i'm from alberta canada. >> have you been watching much television. >> i try not to keep up the noise with what is going on out there. alberta is a huge f
for entitlement reform. he wanted, if you're going after in selma reform, you want ideally to have, you know, bipartisanship and pieces of the democratic presidents of the they could not walk away from it. and so he believe that he could leverage, you know, the deep conservatism of the two-party into action, but he has failed to do so. and the tea party freshmen with whom i spent a great deal of time, and i have spent time with an awful lot of them, you know, like him personally, found an admirable in the way of a genial ceo, but certainly not as their real leader. and that has been implicitly to clear throughout the hundreds of congress. now, the majority leader, a bit different, somewhat younger, very, very, very clever guy. he has his own back channels and the obama white house with by -- vice-president biden. they found that they meet each other as information sources. i believe it was biden, this would not surprise any of you, that was leaking to eric cantor that the speaker was pursuing separate talks with obama during the so-called biden talks of which eric cantor was a part. this may
in the annual march from selma, montgomery. it was an incredible feeling. there i was with congressman john lewis, someone who has an historic role from the original march and so many others. it was ethel kennedy. it was reverend al sharpton. there were hispanic leaders there, including myself. everyone came together. when we came over the bridge, i got a glimpse into what the might have been like in the past. i also got a glimpse of what the future looks like. it was powerful to me to know we could come this far after enduring so many challenges. and the fact we were there to get the fighting against voter suppression loss and anti- immigrant and anti-hispanic loss gives me great confidence that we can tackle many important issues we face today. you have a commitment from the national council of la raza to help figure the solutions out so we can keep the country stronger. thank you very much. [applause] >> at this time, we are going to start the panel discussion. it is my pleasure to introduce jonathan capehart to moderate the discussion. [applause] >> good morning, everyone. thank you all
and the bridge in selma, alabama, the incident was known as "bloody sunday," one of the most important markers in the civil right movement's history. if anything now, the fire next time, that manifesto of what might come to be in america if we didn't face this past, the fire next time, the 1963 sellere months number one on the "new york times" best seller's list, seems a bit too prophetic. by late march, baldwin in selma himself to participate in the voter registration drive and ultimately in the famous march from selma to montgomery march 25-29, 1965. baldwin joined the throng as it swelled on the highways, 25,000, 35,000 strong from all over america, and timely reachedded the old capital of the confederacy in month come ri. if we wish to see just what was at stake in the clashing versions of the history and memory of the civil war era with all their resonances in the civil rights era, which is what this book is really about, a small remembrance in one of baldwin's 1965 essays tells the tale. the voice of the civil rights movement, which what he was called at that point, not malcolm x, baldwi
correspondent for the hill, amy parnes. chief correspondent for mcclatchy newspaper steve selma. welcome to you both. >> thank you. >> steve, why don't you head on up here? i'm going to begin with amy. i want to read you part of speaker boehner's op-ed on fiscal cliff negotiations. if we're serious about getting our economy moving again, solving our debt, and restoring prosperity for american families we need to repeal obama care and enact commonsense step by step reforms to start with lowering the cost of health care. would democrats consider putting any part of the president's signature health care legislation on the table to negotiate? >> no. it's just not going to happen. i mean you remember last year, democrats wouldn't -- refused to budge on this issue. they're not going to do it again. president obama's out there, all campaigns saying health care is law now. now that he's in office again for a second term, there's no way this happens. it didn't happen last time. it won't happen this time. >> so then, steve, i thought he said affordable health care act was the law of the land a couple wee
in montgomery, the hoses in birmingham, a bridge in selma and a preacher from atlanta who told a people that "we shall overcome." yes, we can. a man touched down on the moon, a wall came down in berlin, a world was connected by our own science and imagination. and this year, in this election, she touched her finger to a screen and cast her vote, because after 106 years in america, through the best of times and the darkest of hours, she knows how america can change. yes, we can. america, we have come so far. we have seen so much. but there is so much more to do. so tonight, let us ask ourselves: if our children should live to see the next century, if my daughters should be so lucky to live as long as ann nixon cooper, what change will they see? what progress will we have made? this is our chance to answer that call. this is our moment. this is our time -- to put our people back to work and open doors of opportunity for our kids, to restore prosperity and promote the cause of peace, to reclaim the american dream and reaffirm that fundamental truth that out of many, we are one, that while we breath
of march and most recently this year in the annual march from selma mike on my end for us to montgomery and alabama it was an incredible feeling. there i was with congressman john lewis, someone who obviously have the historic role from original march and so many others. it was at the kennedy. who is reverend al sharpton and there were hispanic leaders there including myself. the patient pacific american leaders and everyone came together. but we came over that bridge, i got a glimpse into what that might have been like in the past and i also go got a glimpse of what the future looks like. and it was powerful to me to know that we can come this far after her in so many challenges. the fact we were there together fighting against voter suppression was an anti-immigrant and anti-hispanic was that we came together as a coalition. he gives me great confidence to think that we can tackle many important issues we face today. you have a commitment from the national council to work with you while you to help review solution so we can keep the country stronger. thank you very much. [applause] >>
days later he died. and it was his death that spurred the march from selma to montgomery. so most people know about that march, but today don't know it was jimmy lee jackson's death that brought it about. >> host: i want to show our viewers what the inside of your book looks like here, and it's done in graphic novel form. why? >> guest: yes. yes, i'm the illustrator as well as the author. art is my first love, and so this was the way to tell my story visually not only because of my art background, but also it was a way to incorporate some of the images of photography. that motif runs throughout the book. that's why it's called "darkroom." >> host: what do you do today for a living? >> guest: well, i am -- after spending four years writing and illustrating this book, it has over 500 illustrations, i have devoted my time to book tour and to speaking to classrooms, um, university and otherwise, and i'm also beginning a possible second work as a novelist in fiction. >> host: now, when you visit argentine ya today, are you an argentinean or are you an american? >> guest: you know, it's
of marching most recently this year in the annual march from selma montgomery and for us in alabama it was an incredible feeling. there i was with the congressman john lewis, someone who obviously has a historic role from the original march, and so many others. it was the reverend that all sharpton and there were hispanic leaders and putting myself and there were asian pacific american leaders and everyone came together. when we came over that bridge i got a glimpse into what that might have been like in the past and i also got a glimpse of what the future looked like. and it was powerful to me to know that we could come this far after enduring so many challenges. and the fact that we were there together fighting against the voter suppression law and anti-immigrant and antihispanic that we came together as a collision. it gives me great confidence to think that we can tackle many of these important issues that we face today. you have a commitment from the national council of la raza to work with you all and to help figure these solutions out so that we can keep the country stronger.
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)